Due to COVID-19, we ask that all visitors to our office wear face masks and socially distance themselves, including during consultations. We are also available via video chat, phone, or email.

The Trusted Law Firm of Northern Nevada
Divorce

Can You Keep a Divorce Private in Nevada?

Divorce is a deeply personal matter. In addition to the sadness, grief, and anger that naturally come with this life event, divorcing couples also feel the eyes of their family, friends, and acquaintances in their lives in a very uncomfortable way. People want privacy at this moment. They don’t want nosy people reading about their private lives or the public to hear embarrassing or inflammatory allegations made against them, or for the public to have access to their finances and wealth.

We are frequently asked what steps can be taken to keep divorce private. Fortunately, Nevada offers options to keep sensitive information from prying eyes when a marriage ends.

Sealing Divorce Pleadings

Generally, pleadings and documents that are filed in clerk’s offices are considered public records. This is because courts serve the public and are meant to operate transparently. There are exceptions when the law allows courts to order divorce files sealed.

Under Nevada Revised Statute 125.110, a party can make a written request to seal the divorce record. Upon this request, the clerk must seal and cannot open any “papers, records, proceedings and evidence, including exhibits and transcript of the testimony”. The exception to this is the legal pleadings filed, the findings of the court, and any orders and judgment issued by the court. Sealed records cannot be revealed or inspected by anyone except for the parties in the divorce proceedings and their lawyers.

Sealing divorce proceedings can go a long way toward preventing unwanted interlopers from accessing and spreading your very personal information.

Trial May Be Private

Divorcing couples have the right private trial proceedings upon request by either party. This excludes members of the public or people unrelated to the divorce or the parties from being present at trial and keeps private the facts that come out at trial. Further, either party can ask the court to determine whether to exclude family members and witnesses from being in the courtroom.

Viloria, Oliphant, Oster & Aman L.L.P., Divorce Lawyers

Your divorce should be a private matter. At Viloria, Oliphant, Oster & Aman, L.L.P., our lawyers appreciate this and will take every step necessary to maintain your discretion when your marriage ends. Our lawyers are intelligent, experienced, and proven. Let us represent you. Call Viloria, Oliphant, Oster & Aman L.L.P. today at (775) 227-2280 to schedule a consultation or contact our office through our website.

Categories