Due to COVID-19, we ask that all visitors to our office wear face masks and socially distance themselves, including during consultations. We are also available via video chat, phone, or email.

The Trusted Law Firm of Northern Nevada

Can Rear-End Crashes Be Eliminated?

Rear-end collisions happen frequently, as you will probably agree if you have ever been in one. While they can be deadly, even when they are not, they often leave individuals with serious neck or spinal injuries. Distracted drivers, or drivers following too closely, are caught off-guard when the car in front of them suddenly puts on the brakes. Well, the US Department of Transportation has decided to put a stop to these "rear-enders."

How are they going to do this and when? The National Highway Safety Administration plans to add a requirement for automatic emergency braking (AEB) features to their 5-Star Rating System. The announcement was made on Nov. 2 and is planned for 2018.

AEB systems will use radar and camera sensors to help determine if the automobile is in danger of a rear-end collision. The technology will apply the brakes automatically to avoid a collision when the driver does not take action. According to the NHTSA administrator, "We're putting the brakes on rear-end crashes."

This is just one of several steps that are planned to make driving safer in the future. Allegedly, ten well-known automakers have already committed to putting the new AEB feature on their new models. A proposal is also in the works to require transmitters for safety communication from one vehicle to another and expected to be required in new car models.

While these features may be required in 2018, we know that existing car makes and models could remain on our highways for many years to come. That means rear-end collisions, as well as other auto accidents, will, unfortunately, continue to occur and put people at risk. If you have been rear-ended and suffered injuries or damages, these future plans may sound just a few years too late for you. Your only option may be a legal route for settlement of your indemnities.

Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, "U.S. DOT to add automatic emergency braking to list of recommended advanced safety technologies in 5-Star Rating system," Kathryn Henry, Nov. 02, 2015

Categories